First Time Visiting? Start Here!

Homemade, dairy-free strawberry ice cream

Now is the time of year when you try to include strawberries in nearly everything that you eat.  For summer is fleeting my friends, and soon the rains and chill of November is upon you, and unless you made like a diligent little ant and squirreled away enough strawberries to freeze, you’ll be a strawberry ice cream-free sad bastard grasshopper.

If one of your little ant friends can’t stomach dairy, this is a great way for them to feel like part of the gang when it is ice cream time.  This recipe is lush, and creamy, and includes only four ingredients.

I’m not going to lie to you, if you’re used to strawberry ice cream made with real cream and milk, this doesn’t taste exactly like that.  This isn’t my favorite way to eat strawberry ice cream (that would be Alice Water’s recipe), but if you or someone you love has a dairy or egg allergy, this will give you a great alternative.  And unlike a “real” strawberry ice cream, this recipe doesn’t require heating an eggy custard base and then cooling it down.

Dairy-free Strawberry Ice cream
2 cans of coconut cream (don’t be a douche and use light coconut milk)
3 cups of halved strawberries
1/3 cup evaporated cane juice (much cheaper at Costco)
2 tsp vanilla extract (make your own)

1) Place the cans of coconut cream in the fridge for two hours.

2) In a very deep bowl (this is my favorite for just about anything), place your strawberries and evaporated cane juice, and lightly stir.  If you are patient, let it sit for a few hours to let the juices macerate.

013

015

3) Once the strawbs are good and juicy, add the coconut cream, which will be very hard, to the bowl with the strawberries.

017

4) Using an immersion blender, combine the coconut cream and strawberries.  No immersion blender?  Go ahead and weep now.  Or, just use a blender or food processor.

019

Once blended, add your vanilla.

020

Take a break for quality control.

024

5) With your ice cream maker running, add the cream mixture, and process until it resembles ice cream.

025

Now, you’d think waiting for it to become ice cream would be boring, but little did I know, the ice on the ice cream bowl was really a family of ice crystals that would jump on the counter and become liquid…

[KGVID width=”568″ height=”320″]http://sustainablecooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/IMG_1229.mov[/KGVID]

6) Transfer to a freezer-proof container, and freeze until hard.  I don’t like plastic wrap, but I will use a small piece to cover the top of the ice cream so that there is no surface area exposed to air.  This keeps it from getting crystallized.

027

Don’t be a sad little ant, make some dairy-free ice cream today.  Screw winter…there is fruit at the grocery store.  Right?

Ha ha, had you going there, didn’t I?

Making this recipe or others?

Post a photo on my Facebook page, share it on Instagram, or save it to Pinterest with the tag #sustainablecooks. I can't wait to see your take on it!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

4 comments on “Homemade, dairy-free strawberry ice cream”

  1. This looks really yummy! I will add an ice cream maker to my list of kitchen wants.

    Love the imagination :0)

  2. Looks yummy! This is off topic but I wanted to share that I saw sumac at Trader Joe’s in Louisville, KY the other day. (In case any other readers were having trouble finding it) It was in a four pack of different exotic spices. You call for it in your hummus recipe and I had to look everywhere for it, I finally found mine at a Middle Eastern grocery store. The sign at TJoes’s said it was a new item but I do wonder if it’s just a special buy or whether they will carry it permanently. Also, on another topic, do you have a recommendation for ceramic cookware?

    • Ohhh yum! What other spices were in that pack?

      What kind of ceramic cookware? Fry pans, pots…? I’d probably go for cast iron for frying pans, and enameled cast iron for a dutch oven. But none of those things are really ceramic…

      • The combo pack has: ras el hanout, sumac, zhoug, and pipelchuma. I have never heard of any of them, besides the sumac (which I only knew of as a poisonous plant before I read about it on your hummus post!) I linked to a blog that has a picture because I wanted you to be able to see what they look like. Aren’t the different colors of the spices so pretty?!

        About the cookware, I thought I read one time that you were phasing out your Teflon pans and awaiting the delivery of ceramic frying pans. I was just curious if you were happy with the swap and which brand you went with! If you put an Amazon link to the product, I will try and buy from it 😉

        http://pandabytes.blogspot.com/2014/06/spice-route.html